Contents Oratio Dominica
The Lord's Prayer

This prayer was given to us by our Lord Jesus Christ Himself when the apostles asked Him to teach them how to pray (Mt 6:9-13) and thus the prayer has been a part of the Church since the very beginning. The Didache (1st-2nd century) commends the prayer to be recited by the faithful three times during the day. In the latter part of the 4th century it became an official part of the Mass and was recited after the breaking of the bread. Later, Pope St. Gregory the Great, influenced by St. Augustine, moved it to just before the breaking of the bread where it has been ever since. Today, the Didache's tradition of reciting the prayer thrice daily continues in the Church with the Lord's Prayer being recited at Mass and then twice more during the Liturgy of the Hours, at Lauds and Vespers.

Prior to the Protestant Reformation, the Our Father was universally recited in Latin in the West by clergy and laity alike. The rather curious English translation we have today is due to Henry VIII's efforts to impose a standard English version across his realm. Catholics, not wishing to be overly conspicuous in a place very hostile to the Catholic Church at the time, adopted the translation in order to remain inconspicuous.

PATER NOSTER, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen. OUR FATHER, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

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